REVOLUTION RUSSELL BRAND BOOK

adminComment(0)

In this book, Russell Brand hilariously lacerates the straw men and paper tigers of our To ask other readers questions about Revolution, please sign up. Revolution is a non-fiction book written by the British comedian, actor and political activist Russell Brand. In it, Brand advocates for a non-violent social revolution. Revolution [Russell Brand] on icvamlakunsva.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers . NATIONAL BESTSELLER We all know the system isn't working.


Revolution Russell Brand Book

Author:BART PFENDLER
Language:English, Arabic, Hindi
Country:Denmark
Genre:Health & Fitness
Pages:403
Published (Last):14.09.2016
ISBN:341-8-52691-570-3
ePub File Size:26.54 MB
PDF File Size:15.63 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Downloads:41763
Uploaded by: ARRON

Read Recovery: Freedom From Our Addictions book reviews & author details and Revolution Recovery is the 12 steps, as translated by Russell Brand. download Revolution by Russell Brand (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Russell Brand's desire to lead a global revolution is undermined by his confused and smug; filled with references to books Brand has half.

I do also like that Brand acknowledges that there are people smarter than him and rather then take their ideas as his own. He quotes them and explains them. The parts of the book I did not like is the writing style, it is very disjointed.

He makes a good point, explains it well in laymans terms, but then he goes off in a tangent or a story then comes makes another point. It is like doing a job then running round the block to do the next bit. The other problem with the concept of the Revolution it's self. It is unknown even to him when the Revolution does come is he going to be a leader or a victim of it. As even though he is spewing all these damming facts about rich, he is still one of them.

He says he would rather give up his money and life in the society the revolution creates, but the same concept of losing everything he has worked for and conditioned to think he wants scared the crap out of him.

View all 9 comments. Oct 30, Goddess Of Blah rated it it was amazing. There will be many right-wingers and establishment trolls who will trash this book. They don't want you to read the message. But just ignore the writer and focus on the message - does it resonate with you? Do you feel inequality has exceeded it's limit? Does anyone really need billions to live? Why are there so many billionaires when there's people in Africa who are starving? Why do Foreign Corporations influence over governments and shape poli There will be many right-wingers and establishment trolls who will trash this book.

Why do Foreign Corporations influence over governments and shape policy whereas we, the people can't? If you ever question the system, or have even the slightest dissatisfaction with the status quo - give this book a chance. It brings ideas in a manner that won't bore you with too much detail It is a thought provoking read that will hopefully inspire a positive change. View all 4 comments. Oct 28, Joanne Harris rated it liked it. When I was at university, I met a number of champagne revolutionaries, all of them articulate, theatrical, presentable and clever enough to sound convincing, especially at parties.

This book - entertaining, well-written and often funny as it is - is equally convincing, and ultimately, equally toxic.

Russell Brand’s call to arms is a rambling, egocentric mess, says Robert Colvile

Marie Antoinette amused herself by pretending to be a shepherdess. Look what the revolution did to her. At the moment Russell Brand is playing Che Guevara.

But if there's ever a revolution, I wouldn't rate his chances. View all 17 comments.

Nov 03, Richard Butchins rated it did not like it. Oh dear, the bewildered, Beverly Hills buddhist, is back. I have a confession to make. I didn't finish this book, it became so irritating I gave up about chapter ten. This is the book equivalent of listening to the guy at the end of the bar who's taken far too much cocaine and insists on telling you, in a loud voice, he has the solution to the world's problems.

It all sounds great to him at the time but is, on reflection, the mutterings of, and I quote Brand himself. I like the fact that Brand has the platform to ramble, as long as he's funny. This book isn't funny, it's too didactic to be funny. I am not going to wade into the swamp of political populism that Brand inhabits, suffice to say that it's a bog and sticky and it ain't going nowhere.

The fact that Brand used Johann Hari as a researcher is puzzling.

Revolution

Hari was stripped of his Orwell Journalism prize in after having to admit multiple charges of plagiarism and making malicious edits to several of his critics Wikipedia pages. Hardly the fount of veracity required to give Brand's book substance. And that's it, the book lacks substance and the writing is piss poor. A bizzare combination of chatty "alright geezer" conversational style mixed with an alarming use of too many adjectives.

It's like someone stuffed a thesaurus up Brands ass and he can't stop shitting words. It's good for Brand's brand, no doubt, but it's really only a book for Brand fans, he's unlikely to win any converts with this, then again I don't think that was the purpose of this publication.

However, if you insist on having it, then at least steal a copy. Brand should approve of that… View all 22 comments. Oct 25, Ted rated it really liked it. Academics will loathe this book, while the masses rejoice Lets admit a simple truth here. The research for this book comes across as if it were a fourth year term paper written at four am.

This does not mean it is any less relevant, nor does it diminish its social significance. Instead, what this book is, is an impromptu manifesto for the masses.

His audience is the eighteen to twenty five demographic, those just entering or leaving a university or college institution. Now, I may not be famili Academics will loathe this book, while the masses rejoice Now, I may not be familiar with all students, but most that I encounter have little recollection of lectures, and spent most of their time strung out.

This is where Brand emerges. He's accessible and a lot more relatable than an economics professor, and while your understanding of economics may suffer, there is still something else to be gained. Lurking just beneath the surface; he advocates for a Revolution in consciousness.

This is advice I am more than willing to give credit. Brand spent a decade mired in substance abuse and another in pursuit of fame and celebrity, only to emerge advocating vegetarianism, sobriety, meditation, and yoga.

Say what you want about him and his revolution, but something has to be learned from a man who has everything and is now trying to give it away. Oct 25, Tariq Mahmood rated it it was amazing Shelves: I think Russell Brand has presented a pretty relevant argument.

Bestselling Series

All the issues he has highlighted are the ones almost completely ignored by the big media conglomerates of the world. The world opinion is slowly shifting against the rich and powerful cabals, and Russell's effort will surely help galvanize public opinion, especially giving voice to the failed and immigrants languishing in obscurity in every developed country.

I also thought the analogy with his personal drug rehab was also necessar I think Russell Brand has presented a pretty relevant argument.

I also thought the analogy with his personal drug rehab was also necessary, as he was able to draw an apt comparison with the plight of the ordinary worker, addicted himself by paying bills and tax diligently to a government which isn't really representative of his needs. Russell has also come out into the open with his open admission to faith and God, which in this day and age is a pretty courageous endeavour.

I admire his new ideology of placing spiritualism into the centre replacing economy like in capitalism and Marxism. Jemima Khan must have a thing of dating revolutionaries. Her first husband Imran Khan is trying to conduct a revolution in Pakistan as well as her new beau Russell in Britain. View 1 comment. Oct 28, Mindy Graham rated it did not like it. Someone take this man's pen license away.

I read this book after seeing an interview that intrigued me about his political leanings. Sadly, an entire book added nothing to the ten minute piece I had already seen. The book leaves the impression that Russell has heard a few people speak and sat there thinking, "yes, I totally get this. Not only do I get this but it will be so much better when -I- tell people about it" He then walked away with a surface understanding of a bunch of kind of related i Someone take this man's pen license away.

Not only do I get this but it will be so much better when -I- tell people about it" He then walked away with a surface understanding of a bunch of kind of related ideas which he has tried to stretch out into a novel.

He leaps from one half thought out notion to another. Just when he should be getting down to specifics or suggesting ideas to improve the lot of the world he shares a barely related anecdote and moves on. Thrown in for a bit of fun are some conspiracy theories and the deep thought that science require as much faith as religion Rinse and repeat for nine hours I had the audiobook version.

Ten points for passion. One for research. None for depth of understanding of any of the points he is trying to lay out. Oct 18, John G. I agree completely with his political and economic analysis, less so on the spiritual side of things. His book reminds me of a Micheal Moore movie in tone and style. I'm not at all familiar with Brand's comedy or his other books, but found his comedy in this book to be somewhat lowbrow and distracting, even grating. He gives off the impression of being a I agree completely with his political and economic analysis, less so on the spiritual side of things.

He gives off the impression of being a new professor, using arcane and big words to try and impress his readers. I think this book is worth reading, maybe not downloading at full price. This book most likely wouldn't have been published without Brand's status, but nevertheless, what he says about the state of the world and our way out of our trouble is spot on, our political is a fraud and only serves our rich overlords, absolutely no change will come from treating it or our "leaders" as legitimate will solve anything.

I think too that Brand is indeed earnest and sincere and wanting to make deep structural changes to the way our world is being run and effectively ruined.

Aug 10, Eric rated it did not like it Shelves: If you're looking for the coked out diatribe of a narcissist who watched a few too many political documentaries on Netflix, this is the book for you. Dec 02, Angel Edwards rated it it was amazing Shelves: If Christopher Hitchens and Oscar Wilde could have produced a child, it would have the sharp wit and intelligence of Russell Brand.

View 2 comments. Nov 26, Nigeyb rated it really liked it. A good friend suggested I listen to "Revolution" by Russell Brand which was something I would not have done otherwise. From feeling ambivalent about Russell Brand, I am now a convert. His style and demeanour appears to antagonise a lot of people, however his message is prescient and important. In essence, it is that our planet is going to be uninhabitable if we don't change what we're doing and how we do it. He also highlights how change is never going to come from within the current system, hen A good friend suggested I listen to "Revolution" by Russell Brand which was something I would not have done otherwise.

He also highlights how change is never going to come from within the current system, hence "Revolution". I urge anyone who takes against his personality or style, or who is tempted to find a few flaws in some of his arguments, to bear in mind that he doesn't set himself up as an expert. His main objective is to highlight some of the very important issues that the media would rather distract us from.

Examples include: Taxation - huge amounts of tax avoided by the very rich and by large corporations The growing division between the very rich and the rest How the media serves the needs of the rich and powerful and so cannot be trusted The unsustainable rampant consumerism which will render our planet uninhabitable in a few generations The demise of a sense of community The importance of spirituality for a fulfilled and harmonious life The scapegoating of minorities Legal changes which accelerate and exacerbate this list How change can only come from outside the current system Like him or loathe him, these are some of the biggest issues facing the UK and indeed our planet.

Some sections of the book are underpinned by his sense of spirituality and cosmic connectedness that seems to have been inspired by his ongoing recovery from addiction.

He uses and credits ideas from renowned thinkers and radicals like Noam Chomsky to highlight issues and also to propose solutions. I hope his passion continues to burn brightly - we need him and people like him. Dec 15, Amy Laurens rated it liked it Shelves: Listening to this audiobook in the car was a bit like giving a ride to a hitchhiker at the end of his gap year, his rucksack all weighed down with philosophical tracts he'd read on the beach in Thailand and his eyes aglow with the kind of idealism that goes hand in hand with never having had a job or a mortgage.

I mean that in the nicest way, because unlike much of the commentariat, I like Russell Brand. He's a working class autodidact, which means in this book's particular context that his writ Listening to this audiobook in the car was a bit like giving a ride to a hitchhiker at the end of his gap year, his rucksack all weighed down with philosophical tracts he'd read on the beach in Thailand and his eyes aglow with the kind of idealism that goes hand in hand with never having had a job or a mortgage.

He's a working class autodidact, which means in this book's particular context that his writing is sometimes overreaching and undisciplined. But it's also funny and smart, and often beautiful or even poetic in the manner of a young John Cooper Clarke hence it lends itself very well to being read aloud, and he does a great job.

But also, and this is important, it is fun. He said at one point during my car journey "the revolution cannot be boring". I'm pretty apolitical--if you were to hand me a copy of Piketty I'd just end up using it to press my tofu.

Revolution might be recycling the same ideas in a half-baked way. Nov 07, Michelle rated it it was amazing. I have read books on philosophy and books on politics, but this is like no other book I have ever read. I should make it clear from the outset that I am a Russell Brand fan. I have read other books by him and I also subscribe to his Trews program. I am also predisposed to many not all of the ideas he presents in this book. Given all this it is not surprising I am so positive in my appraisal.

This is an incredibly entertaining and well researched 'manifesto' calling for I understand most people will dismiss it as the ramblings of a famous addict with delusions of grandeur, but I believe his call for ecological sustainability and equality for all is undeniably important. I also enjoyed his ability to reference not only pop culture but from many of my favourite 'serious' writers such as Orwell and Chomsky.

The bottom line is, as Brand states in the book, if you believe the systems we have now are perfect and no change is required, then this book is not for you. You might be surprised. Nov 18, Rou Reynolds rated it really liked it. Finally got round to finishing this. Kept getting put off and putting the book down every time he brought his 'spiritual' babble into it. His verbosity doesn't annoy me, I enjoy it. Very poetic in parts.

Brilliant points throughout the book as well as consistently funny and cheeky. One particular section was embarrassingly anti-science and he even made the mistake of saying something along the lines of "science is bad cos nuclear w Finally got round to finishing this. One particular section was embarrassingly anti-science and he even made the mistake of saying something along the lines of "science is bad cos nuclear weapons". Science is the tool. How we use it is down to politics, propaganda, ideologies, social pressures etc.

If a 'scientific' thought process was applied for the betterment of humanity, nuclear weapons would be abolished. Science ain't the enemy Russell. Nov 04, Flipperty Gibbert rated it it was amazing. As an ex hedonist with a love of the planet, a penchant for spiritual pursuits and an overarching belief in equality, listening to Russell Brand often makes me exclaim an appreciative and ecstatic 'Yes!

Listening to it on audio-book read by the author may have been somewhat pivotal in my decision to proceed thus. The act was no mean feat. It took a while, we engaged a variety of partn As an ex hedonist with a love of the planet, a penchant for spiritual pursuits and an overarching belief in equality, listening to Russell Brand often makes me exclaim an appreciative and ecstatic 'Yes!

Follow the Author

It took a while, we engaged a variety of partners, put a lot of effort into foreplay, and the delivery was articulate and delicious. Yes I knew a lot of the moves already, but they were confirmation that I'm doing this right And just when I thought he was done, he threw in a loving epilogue, offering an extra boost of aural stimulation.

I'm slightly worried that I've been wasting my time on sex and should have been listening to poetically written anarcho-communist fantasies with a humorous twist instead Some of the funniest bits in Revolution are the 'legal asterisks' You've gotta have a bit of humour in with your revolutionary mind blowing aural sensation!

It was also a very humble experience, offering up his own weaknesses, failings and inadequacies with a willingness to improve performance and be a more considerate partner.

The post-reading experience feels a bit like when you have really really amazing earth-shattering sex, and when you're done, you just sit there for ages absorbing it all because life is somehow more wondrous than you ever imagined and those sweet nothings in your ears were inspirational. How can we keep this feeling going? Is the revolution coming? Yes, Yes, Yes! Dec 02, Wayne's rated it really liked it. In reading this I must admit I did think what a wanker.

Given that Brand declared he was a wanker in the first chapters, I had to admit fair call and keep reading. I listened to the audio book read by the author and he did a great job.

There are many really interesting ideas and if you can get through the first couple of chapters it is a really provoking read. Give it a go you won't be disappointed. Jul 25, Rupert Dreyfus rated it it was ok Shelves: When Brand first went all Guevara, most people I knew with a background in activism were rolling their eyes and telling him to fuck off.

I held back and hoped to show some solidarity because even though once upon a time he was part of the matrix, presenting Big Brother and waggling his '70s glam rocker penis around Hollywood Boulevard, he wasn't a particularly bad guy. For what it's worth, I still think he isn't a particularly bad guy. Call me naive but what I read about 70 pages' worth , h DNF. Call me naive but what I read about 70 pages' worth , he came across like he does straight up care about people and the environment, and is now using his fame to bring attention to some important causes which is more than what most A-listers are doing.

That said, this book is shit. It's not even a good starting point for apolitical people to get familiar with politics and activism. In fact it'll probably put most people off.

You're essentially listening to Brand wank off into a tissue just because he can. I wish A-listers stuck to whatever they're actually supposed to be good at rather than making a movie here, recording an album over there, publishing a book in New York, releasing a brand of mascara in Paris, releasing a sex tape when the tabloid headlines abandon you As for Brand's revolution: I sympathise, but the day Theresa May wakes up fully subscribed to Taoism is the day I get Russell Brand's face tattooed over my own face.

It's not a plausible strategy; it's just bollocks and a massive cop out. Finally; it's not poorly written but I clashed with Brand's authorship. One example is using polysyllabic words when a normal one will do. It just comes across a bit dickish to me. It doesn't come across dickish when it's natural for that person to use polysyllabic words in fact I love it when people do it properly ; but it does come across a bit dickish when it's forced.

I just could not get along with it. I feel a bit of a cunt because I hoped that I'd have liked this book enough to give it a favourable review but I just couldn't go through with it.

I gave it an extra star purely because at least the money raised went to some project helping vulnerable people. But this wasn't enough to get on board. Considering Brand is supposed to be preaching peace and love, I've never felt so cold. Read serious commentators and theorists instead because if this is your introduction to radical politics then you'll just think it's a load of wank.

View all 6 comments. This book has been sitting on my shelf for a while, unread. Went to his show last night spontaneously. Got two, unexpected free tickets from a friend who worked the show.

Seats were in the wheelchair section! I don't require a wheelchair, so felt awkward amongst my fellow wheelchair bound brethren.

Russell Brand

But great seats, one row from the front. I like Russell's vision and, much like most younger people, crave the utopia he describes, but uncertain what I can do to help the change. His comedic delivery This book has been sitting on my shelf for a while, unread. His comedic delivery is entertaining. Review update to follow as I get further through the book. Dec 03, Dawn rated it it was amazing Shelves: On screen it can be scintillating; on the page it is mostly disorienting—an amped-up stream-of-consciousness with zero inhibitions.

There is no limit to what can be imagined either; we can now in this moment command the mind to play the Kylie [Minogue] track, then instead of her singing it, have the words emerge from the mouth of an elephant in dark glasses. Your mind is doing it now.

It exists. Now, what were you saying, Mr. Brand, about us following you into in a worldwide revolution? Ironically, the cure Brand is proposing feels very far away from his helter-skelter narrative.

Mindfulness will save us, Brand believes. Is this all an elaborate performance? Loud-mouthed idealism for the sake of greater fame? And the hours and energy he has devoted to his eccentric activism—his writing, his YouTube show , his impassioned and high-speed soliloquies —suggest that he is serious about this, or at the very least, fiercely committed to it.

For a comedian, that is something, even if it's not much. Brand wrote the cover story: an argument that even those disillusioned with our current political systems have the revolutionary spirit within them.

Naomi Shavin is a reporter-researcher at The New Republic. Read More.I am also predisposed to many not all of the ideas he presents in this book. The violence used against us by the status quo's enforcers is the real enemy: But we are examining his tattoos.

It took direct action to get that law passed and inequality still remains — worse, the strike that forced the matter into the public consciousness would be deemed illegal today and would never have happened. I have a confession to make. Dec 02, Angel Edwards rated it it was amazing Shelves:

JOANNE from Chattanooga
I am fond of studying docunments really . Also read my other posts. I take pleasure in ringette.
>